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My hope is to inspire you to be fearless in the kitchen, to try new things, to take the time to make things the homemade way and most importantly, to have fun doing it!

the ultimate oatmeal raisin cookie Cooking View

I know, I know.  That’s a bold title.  In general, I shy away from dubbing any recipe “the perfect ____!” or “best ever ____!”  But this time, I think it is justified.  Oatmeal raisin is surely one of the most classic flavors of cookie out there.  They can be so, so very good.  However, in my experience, they often don’t live up to their full potential.  Too thin, too crispy, too dry…so many wrongs can plague them.  I can’t tell you how many times I’ve gotten one as part of a catered lunch at work only to take a single bite and deem it not worth the calories.

Well, leave it to Thomas Keller to take all the wrongs with this cookie and make them right.  With just a few minor changes from a more typical oatmeal raisin cookie recipe, these cookies reach new heights.  They are a nice, large size, perfectly thick, chewy, and dotted with plump raisins.  In my mind, the most crucial step was soaking the raisins before mixing them into the dough.  It rehydrates them a bit, and helps keep the cookie chewy and moist.  I brought these cookies in to a new work setting and everyone was raving about them.  People were thanking me all day long.  Don’t thank me, thank Thomas Keller!  He’s the bomb.

The Ultimate Oatmeal Raisin Cookie
Yield: about 2 dozen cookies

Ingredients

1 cup plus 1 tsp. (144 grams) all-purpose flour
1 tbsp. (7.7 grams) ground cinnamon
1½ tsp. (7.4 grams) baking soda
1¼ tsp. (3.6 grams) kosher salt
11 tbsp. (5.5 oz or 155 grams) unsalted butter, at room temperature
¾ cup (140 grams) light brown sugar
5½ tbsp. (69 grams) granulated sugar
¼ cup (62 grams) eggs (about 2 large eggs)
2 vanilla beans, split lengthwise
1 tbsp. vanilla extract
2 cups (155 grams) old-fashioned oats
1 cup (156 grams) mixed raisins*

Cooking View

Directions

  • In a medium bowl, combine the flour, cinnamon, baking soda and salt; whisk to blend.  In the bowl of an electric mixer, beat the butter on medium speed until smooth and creamy, about 2-3 minutes.  Add in the sugars and beat on medium-high speed until light and fluffy, about 3-4 minutes.  Scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean into the bowl and mix to blend in.  With the mixer on medium-low speed, blend in the vanilla extract and eggs just until incorporated.

  • Scrape down the sides of the bowl.  With the mixer on low speed, add in the flour mixture in two additions, mixing just until incorporated.  With the mixer on low speed, stir in the oats and raisins, mixing just until evenly incorporated.  Cover and refrigerate the dough for 30 minutes.

  • Preheat the oven to 325˚ F.  Remove the cookie dough from the refrigerator and let stand at room temperature for about 10-15 minutes.  Line baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats.  Use a large dough scoop (about 3 tablespoons) to drop the dough in rounds on the baking sheets, about 2-3 inches apart.  Bake, rotating the pans once halfway through baking, until the cookies are just golden brown and nearly set (they will continue to bake for a few minutes once removed from the oven, so try not to overbake), about 17-18 minutes total.  Repeat with the remaining dough.

  • A blend of regular and golden raisins is recommended in the book.  To rehydrate them, place in a bowl and cover with hot water.  Let stand for 30 minutes.  Drain the raisins and spread into an even layer on clean kitchen towels.  Press gently with another towel to help blot away all the excess water. 

Source

  • http://www.facebook.com/flowerfroggirl Christie McCann

    Oy! You must have disabled right click cause now I can’t pin those drool worthy beauties! :(

  • annieseats

    It’s fixed.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ginny.kochis Ginny Poole Kochis

    I am so making these today. I’ve been craving oatmeal raisin and they look awesome. I tried to pin the recipe, but I’m unable to pin the image of the cookie. Do you know why that might be? I don’t think I’ve ever had that problem on your blog before, and I’m a long time reader…

  • annieseats

    I fixed it. Enjoy!

  • Liz @ Tip Top Shape

    Well, if anything were to ingratiate someone into a new work setting it would be cookies! These look delicious!!

  • http://www.facebook.com/samagaret Sherlie Magaret

    Hi Annie, I wanted to tell you that I received my new issue of Taste of Home on Tuesday and you are the featured blogger. I was pleased to see a familar face even though i dont know you personally. I do enjoy your blog and your recipes and stories. Keep up the excellent work. :-)

  • Kristen

    These sound delicious! Besides oatmeal raisin, another one of my favorite cookies is oatmeal chocolate chip. Do you know if you would be able to sub chocolate chips for raisins in this recipe? Or would adjustments need to be made? Thanks!

  • annieseats

    I’m sure you could substitute. Enjoy!

  • annieseats

    Thank you so much! I am honored to be featured!

  • Louann Zundel

    These look soooo good!! Plumped up raisins are so much better than dried. I like to plump them for chicken salad and then add some of the soaking liquid.

  • Elizabeth Gorecki

    I’m always looking for the perfect oatmeal-raisin cookie (along with the perfect chocolate chip cookie!) so I’ll definitely have to give this one a try. Have a great weekend! :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Machel-Stair-Hogan/713947702 Machel Stair-Hogan

    I actually like to put in SunMaid Goldens and Cherries mix in my oatmeal cookies. I like the combination of sweet raisins and tart cherries.

  • Misty Lynn

    I just had a very disappointing ORC the other day. I will try this recipe this weekend. Thanks!

  • Chris

    Can I use extract in place of vanilla beans? If so, how much?

  • damicomm

    Just looking through my latest taste of home this morning–and you’re featured!!! Congrats!

  • Caroline L.

    I feel like out of all the cookies out there, oatmeal raisin cookies probably feel very unloved at times – but when made right, they are oh-so-scrumptious! This one looks so amazing!

  • annieseats

    You can just leave them out, but they really add a nice touch.

  • http://twitter.com/wvanillasugar Warm Vanilla Sugar

    This is one of my favorite cookie combos! Great idea!

  • Layla

    Can I substitute cranberries for raisins?

  • Meghan Hunt

    I’m so glad you posted something from Bouchon Bakery. I just got my copy as a Christmas gift and have been nervous to try anything from it. It seems so intimidating! Have you made the bread with the Super Soaker yet? I’m anxious to spend this summer (when I have time) using the book for expanding my kitchen knowledge. I’m sure once I actually try something it won’t be that difficult. I think it’s the weighing stuff that’s got me. I know you often say it’s the best, but I’m having so much trouble putting down the measuring spoons.

  • Jenn

    Can you use Sea Salt instead of Kosher salt or do you need kosher salt?
    I <3 Oatmeal raisin cookies and good ones are way hard to find. Awesome.

  • Nicole Harling

    I read that book cover to cover the first day! Thomas Keller is certainly a sweet genius.

  • http://fourandtwentyblackberries.blogspot.com/ Elizabeth

    Oatmeal raisin cookies are one of my favorite cookies ever, if done right, as you said. I’ll definitely have to try these!

  • Heather at Kitchen Concoctions

    I agree, oatmeal raisin cookies must be chewy to be perfect in my book!

  • Jennifer Hsu

    I read this recipe and went right to the kitchen to make them. They are awesome! Amazing! Delicious! Ultimate! Thanks for sharing the recipe. It’s a little more time consuming than your average oatmeal raisin cookie, but absolutely worth it.

  • http://heartsinmyoven.blogspot.com/ Lynna

    Ohhh, I must save this recipe to make!

  • Stacy

    I’ve never been a fan of Oatmeal Raisin Cookies, but these look delish!

  • E Harlow

    I made these tonight and they are really delicious. It was interesting, though, how the weight v. volume measurements didn’t match up. For example, 2 large eggs are way more than 1/4 cup or 62 g (more like 100+ g). and 2 cups of oats are more like 190+ grams rather than 155. Knowing that you often scale your ingredients, I’m curious if you noticed that and which one you went with? (Either way, they could definitely qualify as an “ultimate.”)

  • http://twitter.com/cookingquinoa Wendy Polisi

    These look fabulous! I agree – oatmeal cookies always disappoint. I’ve made more than one batch that I ended up drizzling with icing just to get my boys to eat them. Can’t wait to give this recipe a try!

  • Sara

    What if like me, you hate raisins? Could I use dried cranberries or cherries instead?

  • annieseats

    Sure!

  • annieseats

    I included the measurements as stated in the Bouchon book, so I can’t comment on the discrepancies. I would assume since Thomas Keller is huge on measuring by weight (as am I) that those measurements are the best choice for this recipe. I measured my ingredients by weight. My 2 eggs did actually weigh very close to 62 grams, but then every egg is different.

  • annieseats

    Sure. Enjoy!

  • annieseats

    I don’t know why you find weighing things intimidating. It’s so much more accurate, so you get a consistent result every time. Don’t be scared! And yes, I made the bread with the super soaker (though I didn’t use a super soaker, just a measuring cup and poured it into the hot pan). It was fantastic!

  • annieseats

    Sure. Enjoy!

  • Sarah

    What brand of Kosher salt do you use? I looked on the FAQ, but I didn’t see it listed there. I ask because my cookies were a bit salty (though still good), but I use Morton, and I have read that that brand can be saltier than Diamond due to different processing. Did Keller happen to mention what brand he uses? Thanks for posting the recipe! The Bouchon cookbook is on my “to get” list, but first I need to work through the six cookbooks I got for Christmas!

  • annieseats

    I’m not really a brand loyal kind of person. I usually have Morton kosher salt on hand, and that is what I used for this recipe. Your taste buds may just be a bit more sensitive to salt than some people, so consider reducing the salt next time. Have fun with that Bouchon book!

  • Sarah

    Thanks for the reply. It was from Deb at Smitten Kitchen where I first read about the distinction between Morton and Diamond. Anyway, we enjoyed the cookies, so it wasn’t a deal-breaker! On an unrelated note, I never cease to be amazed by the amount and quality of the content you put out. My husband finished residency last year, and I simply can’t imagine him working the hours he did, being a great husband and dad, AND maintaining a blog as excellent as yours. I don’t know how you do it, but I’m sure glad you do – this is one of the three food blogs I consistently read and rely on!

  • Erin

    I made them. Best tasting oatmeal cookie ever. Don’t even think about making them without the vanilla beans! One thing…they turned out a little cakier than I like (I like a very chewy cookie). Any reasons why? Maybe I beat it too much after the I added the eggs or 2 eggs was too many? And I’ve seen other versions of this recipe and they only used 1 egg. Next I will try with 1 egg + 1 egg yolk.

  • annieseats

    Thank you so much, Sarah. You are too kind :)

  • annieseats

    It could have been the beating. But did you measure by weight or by volume?

  • Nitha

    I LOVE that you are giving the measurements in grams. Such a great help! You are a darling!

  • Scott

    A quick question. I decided to make these today and noticed that the volume and weight measurements on the butter disagree by a fair bit. 9 T of butter is about 4.5 oz. 11 T of butter is about 5.5 oz. Is the 5.5 a typo…should it really be 4.5?

  • annieseats

    I’ve corrected it. It should be 11 tbsp.

  • http://www.facebook.com/Vargasgirl101 Annastasia Pruett

    I made these with Thomas Keller’s c4c gluten free flour, it seemed appropriate. They are good! They spread a little more than I’d like, but the flavor is amazing. And not just for gluten free. I gave them to my husband when he got home for work and he couldn’t tell the difference.

  • Koko @ Koko Likes

    I made mine in three batches, two on parchment and one on silpat. The silpat ones seemed to spread a LOT, and flatten out, while the parchment ones were fine. Just an observation! The flattened ones will go towards ice cream toppings this week!

  • http://www.facebook.com/dionna.s.jacquet Dionna S Jacquet

    I don’t like oatmeal at all. I made these for my sister because she loves oatmeal cookies. I tasted one and I am sold on these. I have had other oatmeal cookies and thought I am never going to like oatmeal in any form. These are ultimate!!

  • Lauren Brune

    I made these last night, but like a few other people noted, they spread all over the baking sheet :( After some research I think a few things could have been the problem… measuring by volume since I don’t have a scale, melting 3 tbsp. of the butter slightly in the microwave, letting the dough sit out too long after refrigerating/before baking, and using a greased sheet since I don’t have mats or parchment. I am going to try baking the rest of the dough again tonight, right out of the fridge, up the oven temp to 350, and use an ungreased sheet and see if that helps!

  • Lauren Brune

    To follow up, those changes definitely helped :) Thanks for the recipe!

  • Kristen

    Made these this past weekend, WOW! I used the volume measurements instead of weights, but they still came out perfectly. These are amazing… best oatmeal cookie I’ve ever had.

  • a_fair_voice

    I’m really bummed. I’ve made SO many of your sweet and savory recipes, and I’ve literally never had one not turn out…until now. Like some others have mentioned, they spread all over my parchment-papered baking sheets. At least my house smells great….?

  • annieseats

    Ugh, that stinks! I’m so sorry they didn’t work out for you :(