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My hope is to inspire you to be fearless in the kitchen, to try new things, to take the time to make things the homemade way and most importantly, to have fun doing it!

How to Make Macarons – Step by Step Cooking View

French macarons are a small cookie with a big reputation.  A reputation for being beautiful and delectable, and also a reputation for being incredibly temperamental and finicky to make.   The first time I made them, and many times after that, I wasn’t sure what all the fear was for.  They had always turned out fine.  But then suddenly, they didn’t.  Sometimes they worked out but sometimes not so much.  I tried various techniques to troubleshoot these issues with varying success but overall, I was frustrated.  I was ready to try something new.  And suddenly, in absolute perfect timing, my copy of Bouchon Bakery by Thomas Keller arrived and it held the key to fixing my macaron frustrations.

The general method I had relied upon before is known as the French method, where the dry ingredients are folded into a meringue.  The method described here is known as the Italian method, and involves incorporating a sugar syrup into the egg whites while they are being whipped (i.e. an Italian meringue), which is then incorporated into the dry ingredient mixture.  Having now experimented with both methods repeatedly, I find I prefer this method for numerous reasons.  First and foremost, I get the results I want consistently.  I prefer the taste, texture, and appearance of these to any I have made before.  Second, the recipe allows some flexibility so to ensure the batter is the appropriate texture for piping.  And third, I find this more convenient in multiple ways.  There is no need to age the egg whites (YAY!), wait and let the shells rest before baking, or to let them sit for ages before oh-so-carefully removing them from the baking sheets.  Pipe, bake, cool briefly, and move to a cooling rack.  Repeat as needed.

So, after making literally hundreds of these with great results, I decided they were ready to be shared with you all.  Hopefully you will enjoy this recipe just as much as I do!  Here I’ll walk you through the general technique and the exact recipe to include measurements is below.  Let’s make macarons!

First, preheat the oven to 350˚ F and place a rack in the middle of the oven.  Line baking sheets with parchment paper.  In a large bowl, combine the almond meal and confectioners’ sugar.  Whisk together to blend and break up any clumps.  (You can also use an equal weight of blanched or slivered almonds and grind them in a food processor, but I much prefer the convenience of almond meal, not to mention I think it ultimately results in a better texture.  If your almond meal is coarse or looks clumpy, you may want to run it through the food processor to grind it a bit more, to ensure a nice smooth top to those pretty cookies.)

Next you’ll weigh out a portion of egg whites to fold into the dry ingredients.  One large egg white weighs approximately 30 grams – just a useful little kitchen tip that comes in handy from time to time.

Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour in the egg whites.

Blend the egg whites into the dry ingredients until evenly mixed.  The mixture will be thick and paste-like.

Meanwhile, combine the sugar and water for the syrup in a small saucepan over medium-high heat with a candy thermometer clipped to the side.  When the temperature is around 200˚ F, begin whipping the egg whites.

In the bowl of a stand mixer, begin whipping the second portion of egg whites on medium-low speed.  Add a pinch of sugar to the bowl.

Continue whipping the whites on medium speed until they form soft peaks.  If soft peaks are achieved before the syrup reaches the target temperature, reduce the speed to low to keep the whites moving.

Once the syrup reaches 248˚ F, immediately remove it from the heat.  Increase the mixer speed to medium and pour the syrup down the side of the bowl in a slow drizzle until fully incorporated.

Increase the mixer speed to medium-high and whip the meringue until stiff, glossy peaks form.  If you are going to add color to the macaron shells, this is the time to do so.  Gel or powdered food colors should be used.  The Bouchon book recommends Chef Master Liqua-Gel colors, and now that I have tried them I whole-heartedly agree.  I have tried so, so many brands of powders and gels for coloring macarons and these win by a landslide.  Just remember that whatever color your meringue mixture is, it will lighten a bit when mixed with the almond mixture, so keep that in mind depending on the end result you are hoping for.

Add one third of the meringue mixture to the bowl with the almond mixture.  Fold in gently until the mixture is smooth.  A bit at a time, gently fold in the remaining meringue until the batter is smooth and runs in thick ribbons off of the spatula.  You may not need all of the meringue, so add it gradually.  (I typically use most but not all of it.)

Add the batter to a pastry bag fitted with a plain round tip with about a ½-inch opening.  Hold the bag perpendicular to the baking sheet about ½-inch above the surface of the pan.  Steadily pipe rounds about 1¼- to 1½-inches in diameter.

The batter may create small peaks immediately after piping, but if it is the correct texture these will smooth themselves away after a minute or two.  If the batter is too stiff, the peaks will remain and the tops of the shells may not be totally smooth.  If the batter is too thin, the rounds will spread further.

Transfer the baking sheet to the oven and immediately reduce the temperature to 325˚ F.  Bake for 9-12 minutes, until the tops are smooth and set and “feet” have formed around the bottom.

Let the shells cool just briefly on the baking sheet, maybe 5 minutes or so, and then peel away from the parchment.  They should come away easily and fully intact.  Transfer to a cooling rack.  Repeat as needed with the remaining batter, replacing the parchment paper with each batch.

Once the shells are baked and cooled, match them up in pairs by size and sandwich with the filling of your choice.  Ganache or Swiss meringue buttercream are my favorite options.  For the most part, the filling of the macaron is where the majority of the flavor play comes in because the shells should not be altered too much or they may not turn out quite right.

Basic French Macarons
Yield: about 2 dozen sandwich cookies

Ingredients

212 grams almond meal
212 grams confectioners’ sugar
82 and 90 grams egg whites, divided
236 grams granulated sugar, plus a pinch
158 grams water

Buttercream or ganache, for filling

Cooking View

Directions

  • Preheat the oven to 350˚ F and place a rack in the middle of the oven.  Line baking sheets with parchment paper.  In a large bowl, combine the almond meal and confectioners’ sugar.  Whisk together to blend and break up any clumps.  (You may also use an equal weight of blanched or slivered almonds and grind them in a food processor, but I much prefer the convenience of almond meal, not to mention I think it ultimately results in a better texture.)  Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour in 82 grams of the egg whites.  Blend the egg whites into the dry ingredients until evenly mixed.  The mixture will be thick and paste-like.

  • Meanwhile, combine the sugar and water for the syrup in a small saucepan over medium-high heat with a candy thermometer clipped to the side.  When the temperature is around 200˚ F, combine the 90 gram portion of egg whites with a pinch of sugar.  Begin whipping on medium-low speed.  Continue whipping the whites on medium speed until they form soft peaks.  If soft peaks are achieved before the syrup reaches the target temperature, reduce the speed to low to keep the whites moving.

  • Once the syrup reaches 248˚ F, immediately remove it from the heat.  Increase the mixer speed to medium and pour the syrup down the side of the bowl in a slow drizzle until fully incorporated.  Increase the mixer speed to medium-high and whip the meringue until stiff, glossy peaks form.  (If you are going to add color to the macaron shells, this is the time to do so.  Gel or powdered food colors should be used.)

  • Add one third of the meringue mixture to the bowl with the almond mixture.  Fold in gently until the mixture is smooth.  A bit at a time, gently fold in the remaining meringue until the batter is smooth and runs in thick ribbons off of the spatula.  You may not need all of the meringue, so add it gradually.  (I typically use most but not all of it.)  Add the batter to a pastry bag fitted with a plain round tip with about a ½-inch opening.  Hold the bag perpendicular to the baking sheet about ½-inch above the surface of the pan.  Steadily pipe rounds about 1¼- to 1½-inches in diameter.  The batter may create small peaks immediately after piping, but if it is the correct texture these will smooth themselves away after a minute or two.  If the batter is too stiff, the peaks will remain and the tops of the shells may not be totally smooth.  If the batter is too thin, the rounds will spread further.

  • Transfer the baking sheet to the oven and immediately reduce the temperature to 325˚ F.  Bake for 9-12 minutes, until the tops are smooth and set and “feet” have formed around the bottom.  Let the shells cool just briefly on the baking sheet, maybe 5 minutes or so, and then peel away from the parchment.  They should come away easily and fully intact.  Transfer to a cooling rack.  Repeat as needed with the remaining batter, replacing the parchment paper with each batch.  (Bring the oven temperature back up to 350˚ F before baking a second sheet, and proceed as before.)  Once the shells are baked and cooled, match them up in pairs by size and sandwich with the filling of your choice.   Store in an airtight container.

  • *All of the measurements for this recipe are listed by weight.  A kitchen scale is necessary for making macarons as volume measures are far less accurate and may result in a poor outcome.

Source

  • http://twitter.com/anna_frr Anna Friguglietti

    very useful and interesting post. thanks :)

  • Laura

    These are gorgeous! Mine are never quite smooth on top. These look as smooth as a baby’s behind. Thanks for the post, my dear :)

  • Yasmin

    This looks great! I’ve only ever tried making French macarons, and they always turn out amazing. I’ll try to make this one and see the difference. Thanks, love you blog by the way.

  • Deborah Andrews

    Thanks so much for this tutorial. As I don’t have ready access to almond meal here (at a reasonable price) I’ve bought whole almonds to blanch and grind myself for these. Now the only thing I need to complete my macarons is time…lol. I’m hoping this weekend will be the time. I have a couple of questions. With this variation is humidity still a huge factor and also does this eliminate the need for drying the cookies for a while before they’re baked?

    This is one that I would love to try. Your photos are great and very easy on the eyes.

    Thanks!

    Debbie…(O:
    >

  • http://twitter.com/LizzTeaBee Liz Tea Bee

    Oh, thank you. I got a new candy thermometer for Christmas that I’m itching to use and a family party on New Years that I’m supposed to bring a dessert to. (I’ll whip up some chocolate chip cookies in case these don’t turn out.)

    I really love your directions and how you tell us about your trial and error. It’s really helped me become a better baker. :)

  • annieseats

    Supposedly humidity can still affect them, but I haven’t had any problems with that yet.

  • http://www.facebook.com/zrzunkaa Kamča Hrbáčová

    awesome photos :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/julie.lenczycki Julie Rocchio Lenczycki

    Thanks for posting this! I hope this method will fix my consistency issues. I will tackle macarons with new confidence!

  • Anne Blackwell

    Is parchment paper preferable to Silpat mats for these guys? I’d rather use Silpat, but if you used parchment I’m guessing it’s for a reason. Thank you for all the work you put into this awesome blog. Happy New Year!

  • annieseats

    The book calls for parchment, so that’s what I used. I trust Thomas Keller so I haven’t even tried with a silpat for these. You could try half and half and see if the silpat works as well. Let me know if you try it that way.

  • http://www.solanoskitchen.com/ Ali

    I’ve had mixed outcomes using the French method – can’t wait to try the Italian! Thanks for the great post!

  • http://twitter.com/CookingwithLT Laura

    Thank you so much for this post! I am very intimidated by macarons but would like to give them a try. This looks like a great recipe to start with.

  • Michelle

    OMG…I have been waiting for this as I was completely intimidated by macarons. I also LOVE your nail polish in the photos btw ;-)

  • Jennifer Sikora

    I’ve always wanted to make macarons. So glad that you shared your step by step recipe.

  • http://www.facebook.com/melanie.bowersstauffer Melanie Bowers Stauffer

    So excited to try these this weekend and since my part of Indiana is expecting 4 more inches of snow, it will be perfect timing to try a couple different filling flavors. What has been your favorite flavor? And if I wanted to make the chocolate, would you just tint them brown and use chocolate ganache or replace some if the almond meal for sifted cocoa powder?

  • Annie @Annie’s City Kitchen

    This is a little eery because “make macarons” is one of my New Year’s Resolutions and I was JUST looking for a step-by-step tutorial. I planned on using the French method but I think I’ll be giving this a try instead!

  • Nicole Harling

    I’m so happy to see someone else using the Italian Method. I’ve had nothing but success with it! Your step by step photos are great!

  • saramama

    Thank you for the tutorial! I have been anxiously awaiting it. I got the Bouchon bakery cook book for Christmas and can’t wait to get started,

  • http://www.diaryofateenagebaker.com/ Christina

    you have no idea how excited i was to read this!!

  • Gemma Hartley

    Do you let the egg whites sit out at room temperature for 12-24 hours like you do with the French Macarons?

  • annieseats

    Nope :)

  • annieseats

    I would sub Dutch cocoa for a small portion of the confectioners’ sugar, not the almond meal. Have fun!

  • http://fourandtwentyblackberries.blogspot.com/ Elizabeth

    Thank you so much for this post, Annie! The first time I made macarons, I ground the almonds myself and they turned out great. The second batch turned out fine as well, but I used almond meal from the store and they had almond chunks in them. The third batch I actually made this past weekend using the vanilla macaron recipe from the Bouchon Bakery cookbook. I ground my own almonds this time, since that is what worked best the first time, but my food processor did not grind them as finely as the first time I made macarons! So, you mentioned that you used bought almond meal; what brand do you use? And, do you know if it is it possible for food processors to lose their steam and not work as great as they used to? Thanks!!

  • Missy Wagner

    How cool is that? I’m so excited to try this recipe. I finally got up the nerve the other day to try my first macarons. I’m excited to find a recipe that doesn’t require ages egg yolks…that step is hard for me. Thank you SO much for sharing!

  • Margareth

    Hello Annie. I’ve been trying to do this cookie but I’m so frustrated. My question is about the egg ageded and the time you have to rest de sheel, before baking.

    I’m going to try your recipe today, and I hope this was my first success.

  • annieseats

    No aging or resting needed. Good luck!

  • Caroline L.

    Macarons have been my biggest obsession this year… will definitely try making them myself!

  • Vanessa

    I’m confused Annie – this method is the Italian but you’ve titled the actual recipe French. Is this correct?

  • annieseats

    French macarons, Italian method :)

  • annieseats

    There is only one brand of almond meal available near me so that’s what I buy (Bob’s Red Mill). I suppose food processors may have issues with wear and tear but I’m not sure. That sounds like what would be an issue with the blade but in my experience, the other (plastic) parts tend to break before anything goes wrong with the blade. You could check smallappliance.com to see if you can replace just the blade, but if it works okay for other recipes I’m not sure it would be worth it.

  • Elizabeth Ann

    Oh my word. . . .I love the step by step directions but need to gather the courage to try it out!

  • http://fourandtwentyblackberries.blogspot.com/ Elizabeth

    Thank you so much! I’ll try Bob’s Red Mill.

  • http://twitter.com/ABitchinKitchen Maggie Gill

    May I just say…thank you for making hundreds of these before sharing the technique with us. I like that I can always count on you for a recipe that will turn out well! I don’t have the Bouchon cookbook, but I have Keller’s Ad Hoc at Home and definitely trust his recipes too :) I’ve been baking for 6 years now and FINALLY got a food scale last week. It may be time for me to get up the courage to try macarons!

  • Gina

    Hi Annie! I’m so excited to try macarons with this recipe since I’ve been too scared to try them until now. I just have to double check about the measurement for the granulated sugar listed here since it seems like a lot more sugar than your other macaron recipes. I know it’s probably because of the Italian method vs the French method but do these come out sweeter than other macarons because of it? Thanks!

  • http://twitter.com/VickiBensinger Vicki Bensinger

    Great tutorial! Great photos! Your Macarons look perfect.

  • lisa whitney

    I had my first macaron on the French island of St Marteen, fond memories! I have since tried to make them twice, and failed. So thank you for the tutorial!

  • jules

    Annie…you are a legend (and not just in your own home ;-) ). I’ve made macarons both ways, but always seem to need to let them sit for ages with the uncooked sugar method. It is far less intimidating than the cooked sugar method though…It is pretty humid here in NZ right now, so have been scared to bake them either way. The one time I tried the cooked sugar method, the macarons certainly sat for less time, but I thought I was going to break my little mixer, the sugar got so hot and hard! LOL I’ve been hinting for a new mixer, but sadly, Christmas came and went, and Santa did not oblige ;-)
    Thank you for making it all appear very matter-of-fact. I shall give them another try, and report back.
    Merry Christmas, and Happy New Year to you and your beautiful family :-)
    Julie

  • Karen Kerr

    This is great! I had the same issue. Several successful attempts lulled me into thinking I had it down. Until I had an entire batch of cracked shells.

  • Summer

    Wow! I appreciate all the work that goes into these. I have a friend that always brings me a box of macaroons from Paris when she visits. The flavors are amazing and so intense. Chocolate, caramel, pistachio, lemon, lavender… They are also super expensive. Now I see why!

  • Celine

    I just got a food scale and have been wanting to make macarons for a while, so this is great timing! These look perfect.

  • sara

    I’m looking forward to trying this method. I recently made your Nutella hazelnut macarons and I had to agree with you that they were much easier than I anticipated. I am still anxiously awaiting your eggnog macaron recipe and hoping you post that soon. Thanks!

  • http://www.facebook.com/maria.worbetz Maria Guerriero Worbetz

    I, like you have had great success in the beginning of making macarons and then all of a sudden…macawrongs…I am sooo trying your recipe…in fact we are having a girls night out and I think I am going to make them for that…but I am going to use blanched almonds, could you tell me how to grind them fine enough……m

  • http://www.facebook.com/maria.worbetz Maria Guerriero Worbetz

    hi Melanie I have made plain ones with a Amaretto buttercream that I dyed pale green, very good!! and also made plain with a chocolate ganach buttercream, also lovely…

  • http://www.facebook.com/maria.worbetz Maria Guerriero Worbetz

    Annie how do y0ou make chocolate ones? Do you sub out some of the almond meal…

  • annieseats

    It’s correct. Totally different method, so different measurements. Enjoy!

  • dek2711

    Am i the only one who noticed that Santa got Annie a 6qt mixer :) ? Congrats !!!

  • Shazia

    Hi, i’ve had issues with hollow thin shells with the french method….is this method going to give me stronger shells, better results?

  • annieseats

    As I mentioned in the post, I have had better success with this method than the French method. I can’t say for sure how they will turn out for you. You’ll have to try and see!

  • annieseats

    I’ve actually had it for quite a while now. Maybe my birthday or Mother’s Day this year? I forget. But yes, I love it!

  • annieseats

    I would sub Dutch cocoa for a small portion of the confectioners’ sugar, not the almond meal. Have fun!

  • Michelle Clausen

    these have been on the to do list forever, and you post has inspired me again to re-visit! thank you and happy new year!

  • disqus_KPy86uukbH

    I’m a bit of a latecomer to the macaron craze but encountered them first this summer in Switzerland (“luxembergerlis” – a smaller twist on the classic version) and have been hooked ever since. I even did a Macaron Crawl in London this fall, sampling different ones from Pierre Herme, Laduree, and several local pastry shops. So excited to try my own!

  • Loretta E

    I’m so grateful for this post! I love that you went to all the extra work to get this up. I’ve been wanting to try tackle these, and now you just took away all my excuses!

    They look like absolute perfection…

  • arpitterle

    Thank you for sharing this! I’ve wanted to try to make macaroons, but they’ve always seemed very intimidating. This makes them seem much more doable. Thank you!

  • Anna Pal

    Thanks for posting this, Annie! I’ve made many macarons using the French method and have had good results myself, except I’ve had issues with the chocolate macarons because they crack. How has your experience been with chocolate macarons using the Italian method? Do you get pretty good results?

  • Tracy

    After several failed batches of macarons, I’m almost ready to give up. I look forward to trying the Italian method. Thank you for the beautiful photos and step-by-step directions!

  • PaintingChef

    This look GORGEOUS! I’d given up on macarons after, much like yours, they just suddenly stopped working. I will DEFINITELY be trying this method. One question for you… do you ever use the cartons of egg whites? I prefer those for the convenience and accuracy…

  • Gayle

    This is a great tutorial! Can’t wait to try them! And I loved the year-in-review recipes. Found a few I’d missed that I can’t wait to try!

  • annieseats

    You know, I have only tried using the cartons of egg whites a couple of times. I haven’t used them specifically for macarons, but I have never had any success with them, so I always just use real egg whites. Also, the cartons generally say that they aren’t best for making meringues, which is what you do here, so maybe that is why I always have trouble with them.

  • http://www-the-baker-chick.com/ Audra

    In case you or anyone else is wondering- I don’t suggest cutting this recipe in half… unless you have a smaller stand mixer than I do, (mine is 6 qts,) and my whisk wouldn’t reach the smaller portion of egg whites in the bottom of the bowl. Because of this- I took it out of the mixer and used the whisk attachment on my hand mixer to get the soft peaks- pouring the sugar syrup evenly and efficiently was near impossible and I had 3 failed attempts at turning my egg whites into meringue….I think it’s essential to use your stand mixer so you can really pour the syrup in evenly. I made 7-minute frosting the next day with double the amount of egg-whites and had great success…. Anyway- I will try the full recipe again after I get over my failures! :)

  • Amanda

    Thank you for this tutorial, I was finally able to make macarons with feet! Do you think I can make only half of the recipe next time?

  • annieseats

    Theoretically you can, however another reader just commented that she tried that multiple times without success. Mainly it is an issue because the mixer does not reach such a small quantity of egg whites.

  • annieseats

    I haven’t yet tried a chocolate version with this method. Hopefully soon!

  • http://www.facebook.com/lan.mitsuki Lan Tran Huong

    This looks simple enough that even I should be able to do this. thank you for sharing (≧◡≦) ♥ Say, if I would like to color the shells, when would I be able to add the food coloring?

  • annieseats

    That is included in the instructions. Enjoy!

  • annasinpajamas

    Thanks so much for this recipe! I’m making a few hundred macarons for a wedding in a few months, and I was so dreading all of the aging and the waiting. This is perfect! Have you tried doubling this recipe? I don’t see why it wouldn’t work, but.. they’re just so finicky!

  • annieseats

    I have and it worked well for me. However I understand your hesitance. They are darn finicky sometimes! (Though thus far, this recipe has not been… ::knocks on wood::)

  • katy

    Some observations employing this method. I’ve used the french meringue method countless times and it has never faltered, but this italian method…

    -I used eggwhites from 6 eggs, but instead of using exactly 82 g and 90 g, the whites were a little bit larger and I decided against trying to scoop out the extra few grams of whites. MISTAKE. the resulting batter was too wet and i ended up undermixing to compensate. This in turn created pointed rounds that did not flatten out

    -In baking at 325, the meringue exploded from the top of each cookie like a volcano. Decreased the temp to 300 but had to cook for a lot longer.

    -The volcano cookies despite not being macarons tasted fantastic. The texture is indeed better than when using the french meringue. I would say they’re chewier and last many more days without becoming brittle and stale. I definitely prefer this texture to the french meringue.

    -Fewer hollow shells, and fuller cookies.

    -This recipe essentially makes a double-batch of what Annie’s french meringue recipe would.

    Overall, the cookies tasted wonderful even if they did turn into volcanos. I will definitely use the correct measurement of eggwhites next time.

  • karin

    Thank you so much for posting this! Finally got up the courage to try this for the first time last night following the instructions exactly, and had success for the most part! My only problem was I managed to under cook my first two trays, which caused some issues. Do you have any tips for telling when they’re actually done?

  • http://weliketwocook.com/ Celine

    Just as a follow up, these turned out really well! They weren’t too hard to make. I was a little nervous, because I had never made macarons before (and the ingredients are expensive so I didn’t want to mess up), but luckily the macarons were perfect and I look forward to making some fun other flavors soon!

  • annieseats

    I don’t have any good specific tips for that unfortunately. I think it’s something that you get a feel for with more practice. I kind of expect to have a few that are destroyed in the process of figuring out what done should look like :)

  • http://www.solanoskitchen.com/ Ali

    I’ve used the Bouchon recipe with a silicone mat and it seemed to work out well! I meant to use parchment, and then realized I had run out; the macarons seemed to bake up fine anyway :) I’d be curious to do a batch 1/2 and 1/2 though to see if there was a noticeable difference. Love your pictures by the way!

  • annieseats

    Good to know, thank you!

  • treetrunk

    Hi this was my first time asking macaroons- thanks for the post! Should the insides be chewy or crisp like the outer shell? Mine came off with smooth bottoms but the insides almost seemed a bit too raw but not sure if thats right since I’ve never had a macaron until now.

    also cooking on a metal baking sheet gave the smooth flat bottoms and when I used a clay baking sheet, the bottoms were hollow- just an observation others might find useful.

  • annieseats

    The insides are more chewy, but if they actually seemed raw then you might want to bake a little longer next time.

  • http://twitter.com/hellomysweet Hello My Sweet

    I followed your recipe to the letter and my macarons were awesome. Thank you so much for providing this fool-proof recipe. After many many unsuccessful attempts, I finally made great macarons!

  • http://twitter.com/hellomysweet Hello My Sweet

    I also use Bob’s Red Mill and it works great!

  • annieseats

    Congrats on macaron success! So awesome.

  • macaronlover

    I have a question, I recently traveled to Australia where i fell in love with macarons. When i tried them they were really soft. I tried a recipe when i got home and they turned out really really hard. With your recipe do they come out soft or not? I was really sad when they came out hard :/

  • annieseats

    These are soft with a delicate outer shell.

  • Valentine

    Hi Annie, just wondering did you usually rest your macarons after piping until the they are dry to touch? Cuz from your recipe you didnt mention any resting time and you baked them immediately?

  • annieseats

    No, I make them as the recipe indicates, no resting required.

  • http://www.facebook.com/michelle.jonesbrown Michelle D. Jones-Brown

    Oh, Annie! Your recipe seemed much less daunting than any other I’ve found, so I attempted these today. Everything was going well until I realized my thermometer was broken! I kept thinking, “It sure is taking a long time to get past 225!” Duh. So, I let it cool for a while, then contined with the recipe, but when I added the syrup, steam started pouring from the bowl. Not a good sign. I beat those egg whites for almost twenty minutes and the never did get to be “stiff”, but they were close so I continued on. Added the mixture to the almond meal mixture gradually, and thought the consistency was right, but they spread all over the sheet. I think if my thermometer had been working correctly, they would’ve been great (at least that’s what I’m telling myself lol), and I’m definitely going to try again soon!

  • http://www.facebook.com/judy.barnard.7547 Judy Barnard

    I also need to make a large amount for an end-of-June event. I was wondering how they could be stored and for how long? Thanks for the very comprehensive recipe directions – they couldn’t be better.

  • magda.soliman@myfwc.com

    can I get the measurement in cups/spoons…etc?

  • annieseats

    *All of the measurements for this recipe are listed by weight. A kitchen scale is necessary for making macarons as volume measures are far less accurate and may result in a poor outcome.

  • http://www.facebook.com/cathy.cogdell.7 Cathy Cogdell

    I’ve made the French Macaroons will success but just tried your Italian recipe.
    I knew when I added the egg white to the dry mixture that it didn’t look right but not sure what to do so forged ahead. Tooo thick. Continued and of course ended up with a mixture too thick and just not right. Any thoughts?

  • annieseats

    Though I haven’t tried it myself, I’ve read that the unfilled shells freeze well.

  • Kelly Hunt

    This is SO helpful, thank you!!! I’m making macarons for the first time this weekend for Easter and I’m hoping they come out as beautiful as yours! xo

  • Kylie Knudsen

    so in the almond meal with the confectioners sugar, you make a well for how much of the egg whites? I was a little confused when I was reading that part of the instructions. Also, is there a need to add some vanilla essence while the egg whites are mixing?? Other than those few questions, thank you for this recipe! I will try this today :)

  • annieseats

    No, no vanilla extract should be added. The exact quantities of various ingredients are outlined in the detailed recipe at the bottom of the page. Enjoy!

  • http://twitter.com/fangeldunc faith angel

    hello … could these be convection-baked and if so, how would you adjust temperature/time? thanks!

  • annieseats

    Sorry it took a while to respond – had to check the book! It says 350˚ for 8-10 minutes in a convection oven. Enjoy!

  • annieseats

    Did you add the separate portion of egg whites to the dry mixture before mixing in the meringue?

  • http://www.facebook.com/carinasingh10 Carina Singh

    they are amazing but Some of them didn’t form feet what could be the cause of it?

  • annieseats

    There are many, many things that can go wrong with macarons since they are a problem prone cookie. It’s tough to pinpoint exactly what may have gone wrong.

  • http://www.facebook.com/vanessa.rehm Vanessa Rehm

    I have these in the oven right now… can’t wait to let you know how they go. My first ever time using the French method was a total success and I wondered what on earth everyone was complaining about when saying they are so hard to master. Haha, second, third, fourth and fifth times were not so successful! Here’s hoping for a good result today!
    1. The best top of the shell I have ever achieved!
    2. The first time I’ve ever experienced the ‘volcano’, bursting effect.
    3. The smallest foot I’ve ever achieved.

    Hmmmm guess I’ll just keep trying. They are definitely the best looking (save the ones that exploded!).
    Thanks Annie :)

  • Sami Cormier

    What is the amount of almond meal in cups? I do not have a kitchen scale but desperately want to try these!!

  • annieseats

    You’ll need a kitchen scale for macarons. Good luck!

  • Vanessa Rehm

    I have just made these again and I have to say, they definitely the way to go! I was freaking out during the entire making process because I felt sure the batter was too thick, but they have cooked perfectly, with no volcanoes this time and flattened in their resting before baking period to eliminate the ‘nipple’. Thank you again Annie for this awesome method.

  • Bryanna

    This is old, and I’m sure someone has asked this before but how would you suggest adding in a flavorin like strawberry or vanilla in with this method?

    Also, for a nutfree version, I used ground pumpkin seeds and it worked well!

  • annieseats

    Flavoring of macarons is more easily done in the filling you choose, not the shells themselves since the shell recipe cannot be changed much without affecting the results.

  • Portia

    Almost all of the recipes I’ve read requires drying time after piping, I tried them all, and unfortunately I have not succeeded in my macaron making :(….do you really not dry your macaron batter? I’m now thinking that the sole reason for my epic fail macarons is that ‘drying time’ I really have to try your recipe, so I can confirm my theory ;-)

  • annieseats

    This recipe does not require drying the shells, and I make it exactly as described here. This is the recipe I have had the best, most consistent results with. However, I have also made many batches using the French method that included drying time, and the majority of those turned out well too. These are a very finicky cookie overall so it’s hard to pinpoint one factor that might cause them to flop.

  • Chris

    Thank you so much for this! I used to make macarons then lost my “footing”. :) I tried this method today and it worked. I got my macaron mojo back. I am stoked!

  • Tanisha Quiche McClain

    They definitely freeze well. I have worked in a bakery that made macaroons and that is how they were stored. They are still delicate, so be careful.

  • Melissa Vasquez

    Made my first batch yesterday. The first dozen came out great- so happy to see feet. The second batch had no feet and stuck to the parchment. Trying to figure out what went wrong…I heated/lowered the oven for the second batch. Any ideas? Can the batter sitting out too long create problems?

  • annieseats

    It’s really hard to know what may have gone wrong. They are finicky cookies for sure! Glad some of them did work out for you!

  • Florence Lucas

    Annie, do you have a favorite buttercream recipe for using with these cookies? If so, where would I find it?

  • Kane Taylor

    OMG this recipe saved me from smashing my oven to pieces. Had to cook them on fan forced but lowered the temp by 20 degrees. They all turned out perfect. all came off the baking paper easily, and they are delicious. Thankyou annie, you are a life saver!

  • annieseats

    It completely depends on what flavor I’m going for. You can use the search bar to look for the various frosting recipes I have. If I don’t love it, I don’t post it, so I recommend any/all of them!

  • Elena

    How many egg whites is needed? 2? It didn’t say

  • annieseats

    82 and 90 grams egg whites, so 172 grams total.

  • Natalie Perry

    I tried these (FINALLY) and I have mixed feelings. Tops were great. They had very little “feet”, if any, and some of them stuck. I know they’re finicky so I won’t ask for advice ;) (I’m thinking it might be my oven temps) I will say, though, that the instruction to “keep the egg whites moving” on the lowest setting while the sugar syrup is heating cause my whites to overbeat, and I had to start over. The second time I just let them sit for 2-3 minutes until I added the syrup. Thanks Annie!

  • Natalie Perry

    They do soften more after sitting for a day or two, when some of the filling is absorbed by the shell’s interior, but the outside will always be delicately crisp.

  • Jennifer Wright Hanna

    This was my first attempt at making macarons :) My batter seemed a bit thicker than your picture. You mix the 82g of egg whites into the almond meal mixture and whip the other 90g right? Just want to make sure that I didn’t mix up the two measurements. I think I am going to give theses another whirl!

  • Christine Hays

    I made these tonight and it was my first try with Macarons. I loved making them. I have a few questions..How do you fix the peaks on top of the tops?
    Also is it normal for the insides to be sort of gooey?

  • annieseats

    The peaks are made if the batter is too stiff. The solution is to mix in more of the meringue mixture so you get the consistency you are hoping for. Yes, the inside of the cookie is soft and chewy while the outside is the hard but delicate shell. Glad you enjoyed making them!

  • Jennifer Wright Hanna

    After my 3rd try today I think I finally got it down to a science! Thank you so much :)

  • Steph

    Oh Annie, I love you! lol The French Meringue method has always been such a headache for me! When I first started making this version, the egg whites wouldn’t form peaks fast enough and then the syrup cooled down by the time it was time to add them… It was a disaster lol So I started the syrup and egg whites over and it worked! These macarons aren’t hollow, aren’t sticking to the parchment, and aren’t spreading out all over the place!!! Now I can make some for my wedding! Thank you!

  • Bridget Herrmann

    Does anyone have this recipe in cups instead of grams? I don’t have a kitchen scale. I had been using the french method just fine and it all turned sour on me recently and hasn’t worked in ages…I have no idea why! I’d like to try this method but again, do not have a kitchen scale. PLEASE HELP!

  • annieseats

    *All of the measurements for this recipe are listed by weight. A kitchen scale is necessary for making macarons as volume measures are far less accurate and may result in a poor outcome.

  • Vanessa Monardo

    Hi! I was just wondering how long they would stay fresh for? I was going to make them today and Christmas is in a week.. will they still be fresh? Thanks!

  • annieseats

    I would wait to fill them until the day you plan to serve them, but the shells keep quite well and some say the flavor actually develops to be better over time. Just store them in an airtight bag or container at room temperature.

  • Amanda

    Finally got a batch that worked! Such a sense of accomplishment when pulling them out of the oven and finally seeing feet! They were small feet and not as pretty as yours, but getting there. They’re still delicious and will be filled with nutella buttercream for NYE tonight.

  • annieseats

    Woohoo! Way to go!

  • Kellea Williams

    To turn them pink like for the bridal shower, do you just add a pinch of food coloring? Will that impact the recipe in any way? Going to try these for a baby shower. Thank you for the step by step. Also, I know that you free handed the piping, but would you recommend one of those baking mats for those of use who are less sure handed? Thank you!!

  • annieseats

    If you read the instructions in the full recipe at the bottom of the post, it indicates when to add coloring and what types can be used. Hope that helps!

  • Ian

    I work for a pastry chef in NYC and was always curious about how to make these in general. Thanks!

  • jennifer

    Thank you for this recipe. When I first tried it, it came out perfect and beautiful except for being so sweet. I thought there was nothing to this..so I attempted to change it a bit to make it less sweet by using less sugar in the syrup. Failed! Any tips on trying to cut down on the sugar? Also, I couldn’t get the temp up to 248 degrees. Why is that?

  • Mina

    I can’t thank you enough! this is my 7th time making macarons and I finally got non hollow macarons.

  • annieseats

    Jennifer, sorry for the very delayed reply! Unfortunately these are a very finicky cookie and don’t handle omissions or adjustments well so I am not surprised that they were a fail when you reduced the sugar. They are just a very sweet cookie by nature. As for the temp reaching 248 degrees, it would have gotten there eventually. It just takes a while sometimes.

  • tara

    Unfortunately this didn’t work well for me. I got a lot of cracking on the tops. I only got about 10 usable cookies from the entire 43 batch :(. Googling tells me my batter was a bit “wet” and the cracking and puffing might be from that. Oddly the 6 bt ones came from tray 2 which sat for a while before baking. I know u said no need to rest but those were my best. I used 3 trays and each had there own problems from spreading to puffing to major cracks. Luckily I planned to make a different dessert for Easter bcuz I didn’t have much confidence in my macaron skills. If I attempt again I will use less egg whites. I wonder if i over or under whipped my egg whites? Maybe my idea of stiff peaks is wrong?

  • annieseats

    Unfortunately it’s really difficult to pinpoint exactly what might have been your issue, especially for a cookie as finicky as these. Whenever I make these, the tray that sits for any amount of time is always a disaster and I don’t know why I even bother because they all explode. So, just try again if you like and see if you have better luck next time.

  • tara

    That’s interesting that your tray that sat around didn’t turn out and mine was the opposite! I guess it just proves how difficult these cookies are. I think if I try them again I will plan to make double what I need just in case. And I thought a good pie crust was hard to master !

  • Rachel

    I’m beyond pulling my hair out on the French method. Over beaten and under beaten egg whites and the folding is where I tend to go wrong. My concern with the Italian method is they would be much sweeter, is that correct?

  • Rachel

    Sorry, I forgot to add to my comment – when I bake macarons (French) at 300F, they tend to burn a bit. 290F works in my oven. Would I go with that or your 325F temperature? I’m wondering if they need to bake at a higher temperature because they are the Italian method?

    Thanks again!

  • annieseats

    I don’t think the Italian version tastes sweeter, or at least not significantly so.

  • annieseats

    I personally would just try the recipe as it is first and then see what sort of adjustments you might want to try. Good luck!

  • Rachel

    Thanks for all your replies! One more question please, when you add the egg white/sugar mixture to the almond flour, it is still hot from the hot syrup. Is this ok? When I make Italian Meringue buttercream, the meringue has to cool quite a bit first. I know we’re talking macarons, but I just wanted to make sure. As you can tell, I’ve wasted a ton of egg whites and almond flour. Appreciate your assistance :)

  • annieseats

    Yes, it’s okay. You add it very gradually while the mixer is going so it sort of tempers the meringue and prevents curdling and such.

  • Bill

    I am going to try this method. Our first two times making these without the boil sugar method were great, but 4 bathes after, all either cracked, didn’t foot or were just terrible. I can’t wait to try this!! Jean Marc in Pittsburgh makes these and is famous for it, and I saw him pour a sugar boil into his batter, and I was asking myself what the heck is he doing?!? Now I know!!! TY

  • Bill

    Today I got my gram scale (biggest loser brand) and I tried for the first time the italian method and for the first time using measurements in grams. It worked!! I have only 3 cookie sheets and I had some batter left in my piping bag, so after the first pan was done I then cooled the pan in the freezer and piped the rest of the batter, but that 4th pan ended up cracking. The 3 prior pans all came out with feet and were amazing!! The batter probably started to harden in the piping bag for that 25 mins or so that I did not have a pan to pipe onto, so when I did they cracked for that reason. I did not use all the meringue, nearly all of it though. Next time I would like to add coco powder OR vanilla and color gel. Thanks for this!!!!!! After my last 4 batches using the french method failed, this was my final attempt and it is success !

  • annieseats

    So glad it was a success! For what it’s worth, my last pan almost always cracks. I don’t think it’s because of the batter hardening, but something to do with the air whipped into the egg whites accumulating while the remaining batter sits. My first trays are always the best. I should probably start scaling down the recipe so that last tray isn’t even made in the first place, and then just make a fresh batch as needed.

  • annieseats

    Yes, that works just fine. Enjoy!