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My hope is to inspire you to be fearless in the kitchen, to try new things, to take the time to make things the homemade way and most importantly, to have fun doing it!

Beef Stew

I have said before that I am not much of a beef-eater.  That said, I do love comfort food, and red meat has really been growing on me ever since I found a wonderful butcher shop near my house.  Also, I don’t like carrots, and Ben doesn’t like peas – but for having so many ingredients we aren’t crazy about, we both really enjoyed this meal.  It did take a bit more time than I had anticipated initially, but it was well worth the wait.  A bowl of this delicious stew with fresh homemade yeast rolls (to be blogged shortly) made for a great meal on a chilly fall day.  There was plenty left over, allowing me to freeze several portions for my brother.  I am submitting this as my entry for Joelen’s Tasty Tools event for the month of October, featuring Dutch ovens.  I have proclaimed my love of my Dutch oven many times on this blog, and I will do so again – it is fabulous!

Beef Stew

Ingredients:

3 lbs. beef chuck roast, trimmed and cut into 1 ½ -inch cubes

salt and pepper

3 tbsp. vegetable oil, divided

¼ tsp. salt

2 cups chopped onion

3 cloves garlic, minced

3 tbsp. all-purpose flour

1 cup dry red wine

2 cups low-sodium beef broth

2 bay leaves

1 tsp. dried thyme

4 medium potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes

4 large carrots, peeled and cut into ¼ -inch slices

1 cup frozen peas

 

Directions:

Dry beef thoroughly and season generously with salt and pepper.  Heat 1 tablespoon oil in heavy-bottomed pot over medium-high heat.  Add of the meat so the pieces are spread in one even layer and cook, not moving, until brown (about 2-3 minutes).  Use tongs and rotate the pieces until all sides are browned (about 5 additional minutes).  Transfer beef to a medium bowl and add another 1 tablespoon oil to the pan, repeating previous steps with remaining half of beef. 

Reduce heat to medium and add remaining 1 tablespoon oil to now empty pan, and swirl to coat bottom.  Add onions and ¼ tsp. salt and cook, scraping bottom of pan for browned bits until softened (about 5 minutes).  Add garlic and continue to cook for 30 seconds.  Stir in the flour and cook until lightly colored (1-2 minutes).  Add wine, scraping the bottom and stirring until thick and flour is dissolved.

Gradually add the beef broth, stirring constantly, scraping up the remaining browned bits on bottom of pan.  Add bay leaves and thyme and return to simmer.  Add beef, return to simmer, reduce heat to low, and cover.  Simmer for 1 hour. 

Add potatoes and carrots, leave uncovered, increase heat to medium and cook for an additional hour.  Add peas, reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 5 minutes.  Discard bay leaves, adjust seasoning and serve immediately.

Source: adapted from Brown Eyed Baker

  • http://cateskitchen.blogspot.com Cate

    I’m definitely going to keep this recipe in mind as it gets colder. I jump at the chance to use my Le Creuset!

  • http://kelseysappleaday.blogspot.com/ Kelsey

    Oooooh I can’t wait until I get my dutch oven for Christmas! I know I could just as well make this is a stockpot, but I don’t think it would be nearly as much fun. This looks so delicious!!!

  • http://www.goodthingscatered.blogspot.com katie102006

    My favorite on a cold evening! YUM!

  • http://www.lichtyfamilyblog.blogspot.com/ Maria

    Perfect for this time of year!

  • https://smsprayhealth.wordpress.com/ Suzanne Spray

    I’ve made this recipe a couple of times…A-M-A-Z-I-N-G! Although, how do you make more of the wine, brothy liquid? Thanks in advance! :)

  • Tara

    This is the perfect beef stew recipe! This past winter it became a quick favorite in our family. Several times, due to timing, I had to use my slow cooker and it still turned out fantastic. After adding the beef back in, I just poured it all into my slow cooker, put on high for 4.5 hours, and came home to a wonderful dinner.
    I also learned that you can freeze wine to use for cooking in the future. I always have the dilemma of buying cheap wine to cook with and not wanting to drink the rest of the bottle, or cooking with expensive wine, both seem wasteful. This way, I just portioned out 1 cup of the wine, poured it into a ziplock bag, tossed it in the freezer, and then I had the perfect amount next time I wanted to make stew.
    Now I just need to try out your rolls to go with it. Thanks, Annie!